Tips and tactics - share your ideas!

Discussion in 'Carry Issues & Self Defense' started by PrepperTraining, August 23, 2012.

  1. PrepperTraining
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    I will start out by saying that I consider myself to be fairly new to the concealed carry world (Been carrying for about two years).

    I am constantly amazed by some of the simple things that we take for granted and that we can make ourselves more secure in our carrying. I'd like to share some of the simple things I've picked up and hope others will contribute theirs as well, or even offer counter points.

    BATHROOM:
    OK - we all need to do it, but us guys have the option of using the urinal or a stall. I have heard people using the stall exclusively with the idea that you're less exposed and MAY have more time to react than you would standing at the urinal. I have been leaning towards the stall, especially in places that I feel less comfortable in my surroundings. How about the rest of you? Do you make a conscious effort to use the stalls as opposed to the urinals?

    REVOLVING DOORS:
    There are a lot of revolving doors in the area where I work. I see this as a potential security risk in that someone could easily trap you within the door. Maybe a little paranoid, but just because you're paranoid, doesn't mean they're not out to get you, right?

    CELL PHONE:
    I used to carry my phone in my right front pocket, just because I'm right handed and that seemed most convenient. I started thinking about the fact that if I had to draw at some point in the near future I would have to call 911. Having the phone in my right pocket would mean doing some juggling between phone and gun. I now carry my phone in my left rear pocket.

    KNIVES:
    I usually carry a pocket knife in my right rear pocket for utility purposes. In one of the classes I took recently I came to realize that my shooting hand would be the most likely hand to be hit in a fight. Not having a knife on the left side would make it difficult to draw if my right hand were injured. Since they're cheap, I now carry one on each side. Makes it much easier to draw if I can't use my right hand at the moment.

    CARRY LOCATION:
    My client is a major financial institution. While I have not been given a copy of the employee handbook, being a consultant, I suspect that weapons are not allowed. I carry a fanny pack with me most of the time that I lock in my desk while at work. I also carry an IWB (Inside Waist Band) throughout the day. Neither of these are going to be high speed draws, but they are well concealed. I have heard arguments against SOB (Small Of Back) carry because of potential spinal injuries. I'm curious how other people carry.

    SITUATIONAL AWARENESS:
    Not having military experience, I find this a challenge. How do you guys practice or exercise this skill? I have started making an attempt to mentally classify people close to me as I walk down the street at lunch. I also try to make a bit of eye contact with each person, scanning as I walk. Does anyone else have tips for this one?

    Take care,

    PrepperTraining.

    Please add any tips that you have found whether for concealed or open carry.
     
  2. rjrivero
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    Great thread. I'll share with you some of my thoughts for what they're worth.

    Bathrooms: Stalls only. Urinals are tactically challenged at best. Peeing while sitting allows you a tactical advantage over peeing with your back to a door. Just saying.

    Revolving Doors and Elevators: I don't use them (When possible). Treat every door like you would an intersection while in your car. Even if you have a green light, look both ways before stepping into the door way!

    Cell Phone: Is on my left hip. Learn to use your weak hand for mundane tasks. I try not to put anything in my right hand that I would be remiss to drop to the ground if I needed to instantly free my right hand for draw. So, my cell phone, my computer, my morning coffee gets carried in my left hand!

    Knives: I've been thinking about this A LOT since the Paul Gomez Memorial Training event last weekend. Both ShivWorks and TDI were well represented at the conference. I have come to the conclusion that small fixed blades are better than folders (Faster, easier, more accessible). The TDI knife and the Clinch Pick are two of the nicest knives out there for small, personal defense. A folder in my left back pocket is not unusual for me, but it's NEVER my only knife.

    Carry Location: I am a 3 o'clock carry guy. The newest fad is Appendix carry. It can get a little less comfortable, but you are able to conceal it well in the appendix area with only a T-shirt. I will play with Appendix carry and see how I like it. Just seems so uncomfortable, from the way it looks.

    Situational Awareness: The whole idea of sizing up the competition is a tricky one. In certain urban areas, making eye contact is a fatal mistake. It's seen as a challenge and can cause violent reaction. However it is NECESSARY to evaluate EVERYONE within your Circle of contact. So how do you do it? William April (Rangemaster) suggests using a "Belt Line Evaluation." His point is that I can get EVERYTHING I need to get from someone by looking at their belt line. The type of clothing, the way they wear their clothing, and anything visible in the belt and pockets are the major cues you want to know about that contact anyway. You can get the arms and chest area in your periphery without worry of starting an eye challenge with anyone on any street at any time.

    This is an excellent topic, and I'm looking forward to other responses.

    Regards.

    RJ
     
  3. Indeed a good post.
    I try to avoid public restrooms if possible but not always easy.
    I also have a slight advantage in that I'm ambidextrous with most task. I carry a folding knife but have been looking for a good fixed blade.
    I don't use a lot of eye contact unless someone is getting to close then I don't care if they like it or not.
    Thanks again for the post
     
  4. PrepperTraining
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    OK, so Sunday night my girlfriend and I were walking out of the theater and I was rehearsing in my head how I would step in front of her, leading with my left arm to push her back in case someone accosted us. This is something we practiced at the last defensive handgun class I took. It was just her and I that night. We talked about it a bit when we got home and discussed that she would try to heard the kids behind her. One technique I heard of is using their hair to direct them - where their head goes, the rest of them follows. I've started trying to make more of an effort to keep them on my left side.
     
  5. I do the same thing, I walk on the right side of wife which is my strong side and gun side. If anything where to happen I step in front of her for her protection. Although there are times I think I will throw her in front of me as a shield. :notlooking:
     
  6. PrepperTraining
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    Hey RJ,

    RE: Knives, have you ever looked at the Cold Steel Safe Keeper? I don't carry this daily, but I think I may start. I like the feel in my hand, and it seems like it would be next to impossible to drop by accident in a fight. (I know anything is possible...) Those two knives you mention look pretty interesting as well.

    RE: situational awareness, I have been practicing your belt-line assessment. I think I like this approach, as you say less challenging. Havnig said that, it seems most of the crowds I run into are sheep and most don't notice my eye contact anyway. When I do make eye contact, it's usually just a slight nod acknowledging the other person. In a shadier environment, I have heard it is usually just enough to let the other side know you're not asleep at the wheel ready to become a victim.
     
  7. Bathroom
    I'm a urinal guy, I always try to get to the one on the end that puts my right (strong side) arm against the wall. If a number 2 is necessary I like the end stall as well. I unholster my sidearm and place it muzzle down inside the left pant leg. Being right handed this position allows for quick access if needed and helps prevent forgetting to reholster the gun as the weight of the gun when lifting my pants and the friction of the gun rubbing against my leg is a great reminder. Believe it or not, I have seen reports where even L.E. Officers have forgotten their guns leaving them in the stall after doing their business.

    Revolving doors
    Not a problem as I rarely encounter them, even if I do I'm not too concerned as the glass will not likely be bullet proof should someone make a threatening move.

    Cell phone
    If I'm wearing a button up shirt with pockets I usually place it in one of the pockets. This allows me to retrieve it with either hand. Sometimes I keep it in my right pant pocket without too much concern because I'm not going to be trying to use it in the middle of a threat situation. The phone won't come out until the threat is delt with either by leaving the area or by direct contact. If you are thinking about making a call in the presence of an immediate threat you have lost your focus and placed yourself in great danger.

    Knives
    Before you even consider carrying a knife you want to be sure to check your local ordinances. Many cities have very strict laws against fixed blade, size and style of knife you are legally allow to carry. Having a concealed handgun license will not cover you legally if you have an illegal knife in your possession. Another thing to consider is, if you draw a knife against a person that is not threatening you with any type of weapon, you can be found at fault for escalating a violent situation. Not to mention that, if the perp has and uses a gun against you he can claim self defense because of the knife you pulled. I remember growing up in the 60s & 70s hearing of guys who had mad knife fighting skills. Its' guys like that, that I don't want to be facing on equal terms. So, if a knife comes out I'm going straight for the gun because no one wins in a knife fight if you both get cut. With that being said, I carry different size Buck folding knives. I use them at work instead of a box cutter. I have a 110 that I carry in a belt case and a smaller pocket folder of the same lock blade design. They are legal and a prosecuting attorney cwould have a hard time portraying them as a tactical weapon. I keep them very sharp but they are the last resort in my self defense tool box.

    Carry location
    Depends on mode of dress and destination. In warmweather I typically carry IWB at the 3:30-4:00 position or RH pocket. In cooler weather I sometimes carry in an NRA belly belly band that I modified by sewing on a cheap set of Wally World suspenders. I can carry 2 handguns, one on the RH and one on the LH side. The suspenders keep the band midline on my torso between my arm pit and my waist even with 2 full size handguns. I always leave one of my middle buttons undone to allow easy access to my gun. If anyone makes a comment that my button is undone I button it, thank them and as soon as they are out of sight I unhook the button once again. But make note, if you carry this way you must practice your draw until you are confident in your abilty to retrieve you gun without getting tangled up in your shirt. I occasionally carry a backup in an ankle holster or in the RH front pocket along with the other modes of carry.

    Situational awareness
    Keeping your eyes moving and your head on a swivel is key. If you try you can develope a style that allows you to look around without seeming paranoid. If you are in the city you can make use of many mirrors on cars and windows found outdoors. Many of the store front windows give you the ability to check your six without turning to face those behind you. The side windows by the entrance are usually the best for this type of manuver as you can appear to be window shopping while checking the reflections in the glass. As you walk by you can scan a very wide area behind you because the angle of view changes as you walk by. Also, I try to make a mental note and to take a wide path on blind corners and poorly lit areas. When coming upon a pontential threat I just look them in the eye and give them a friendly nod. Sometimes I'll add a: How you doing, a what's up or some similar greeting. This way I can get an idea of their intentions without appearing to be a threat to them.
     
    Last edited: September 8, 2012
  8. Minimal Brat
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    I am going to tell her you said that :D
     
  9. Minimal Brat
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    Thank you for the ideas. I carry inside a ccw purse. Haven't found a great way to carry on body yet. My phone was in a zipper part on the back of the purse. I have started to carry my phone in my left pocket. I don't want to have to mess with my purse and can simply drop it once I have my gun out .
     
  10. Oh no. Now I am in trouble for sure. :whistle:

    I would love to get my wife more involved in shooting and have her carry as well. She just does not seem to have the gun gene like I do.
     
  11. PrepperTraining
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  12. PrepperTraining
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    @Just One Shot...
    Reflective surfaces!! I am always checking things out around me using shop windows and doorways!

    Also...
    Blind corners - I use these to practice mentally "slicing the pie". I always give them a wide berth.

    Situational Awareness - here is an article with a bunch of good mind games to play to increase your situational awareness.
     
  13. Minimal Brat
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    Pepper
    thank you
    I have seen this and it doesn't look very practicle to me. Once she closes her pants isn't much of the gun to grab is there. This might work ok with a little gun if you want to wear tight closes but I sure wouldn't want to try to pull a gun out of those tight pants. lol There is no way I am going to stick my sr9c with extended mag down my pants lol. I would need to get way bigger pants for it to fit lol.

    I do have a belly band and for ladies with large chests their t shirts stand out pretty far to cover a gun. I don't wear tight fitting shirts and always wear a t shirt at least 2 sizes to big. No ones business to see the cousins. I had my husband check it out when I wore it and he said if I turned a certain way you could see a bit of a bulge but not to much and just standing and walking he didn't notice it. Good thing in ohio to conceal means to cover and that is about it.
     
  14. PrepperTraining
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  15. Minimal Brat
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    Interesting read.
     
  16. PrepperTraining
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  17. MikeH121
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    MikeH121

    I have probably said so on here somewhere. But when you get range time learn the PS (Point and Shoot) method. Put your index finger on the side and use your middle finger on the trigger. Just point at the target and shoot. You should hit where you point. After some time it becomes muscle memory. You raise your pistol then look at the sights. They will be on target.

    The Army started that kinda training in the 50's. There is video where a guy shoots from the hip hitting steel targets 1 after another. I point at say a silouette target shoulder I hit the shoulder. It allows for hitting your target when down, backing up away, off hand, off balance. It is not a quick thing but does become second nature.

    And as some have said always be aware of your surroundings. Too many people walk and text. Where are they looking? Or in the winter really cold and you have a hood. Have almost hit people in my car because they step off the curb with the hood in the way. You do not have to be paranoid to be aware. Go into some place with the NO Firearms signs.... be aware that almost anything around you can be a weapon. Ink pens work great. Objects can be thrown. The old Superman TV show he would thrust out his chest when they shot but duck when they threw the gun. :lol:

    In most of the minds here the No Firearms signs are like gun free zones. The libs should put one of those on their front door if they really believe gun free means SAFE. But a business can be looking for trouble with one of those signs. But then again you are breaking the law if you enter armed.

    Just learn the gun you carry. To load and shoot it with semi's make sure you CAN load it with one round if needed. That one bullet can be the difference. Some of the smaller carry guns are not comfy to shoot a lot at the range, deal with it and shoot it. You can't get proficient if you don't practice. If I don't have a pistol, I at least have a knife and other "options" around me.

    The bully after school who is not gonna let you walk away, you know the fight is coming. Chew some peanuts or chips when he gets in your face spit them in his and hit his hand when he brings it in front of his face. It adds momentum to your punch. It's dirty but.....if you are in danger fight dirty. You can sometimes walk away from a confrontation, but not always.

    If you must shoot at a running attacker you most likely won't get a headshot. Even if you hit the guys heart with a 45 his momentum can carry him into you. The best shot is the pelvic area, shatter the pelvic bone the body goes down RIGHT NOW. Can't support the weight. So aiming center mass is not the best aim a little lower. Again it takes practice.
     
  18. diesel
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    diesel

    :flag:There is no such thing as "dirty fighting" my friend.:D
     

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