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Practice drills

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May 6, 2014
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How does everyone practice with their CCW pistol? What are your prefered drills and how much ammo do you typically shoot?

I've been focusing on follow through lately and seem to get a good workout with about 100 rounds.

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ADulay

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How does everyone practice with their CCW pistol?
Not to sound like a broken record but shooting IDPA with your carry gun will give you some excellent practice in a good, simulated environment under a bit of real pressure.

Great practice and gun handling with a live weapon.

To a man, everybody that I've seen come into IDPA (and the other sports) gets much better in a very short amount of time and ammunition is no longer just wasted shooting at a static target on a static range.

Read the threads on IDPA here or check it out for yourself locally.

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I shoot IDPA and IPSC--both have elevated my skills. I also dry fire frequently throughout the week.

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Haha, praise him!
I guess I shoukdve specified "outside of the obvious benefits of IPSC/IDPA, what specific drills do you like?"

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diesel

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Excuse my serious ignorance, but could you please explain proper follow thru?:confused:
I am more of an American civil rights violations monitor than an actual good pistol shot.
I sure have a lot to watch with our latest administration.
And a lot more to learn about shooting well from you fine gentlemen. :flag:
 
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Let me know how it goes and what you discover. Hitting the bullseye from a static position is great but it only really focuses on trigger and sights. In the quest to become as well rounded as possible I've found practicing follow through to be very helpful--and fun.

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diesel

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Thanks, Risk, that was very informative. I'm actually off tomorrow with nothing to do.....lol. I believe sometime tomorrow , i'll be in the back yard trying your technique with the Mod. 29 I picked up a few weeks back.
Actually, I think i'll try it with one of my .357's first. I'm much more used to shooting them. Thanks again.:thumbs: :flag: :flag:
 

dogshawred

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December 11, 2012
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Sure.
Follow-through:
http://www.bullseyepistol.com/ron6.htm

From there I focus on breaking tunnel vision, executing a tactical reload and assessing the scene.
Reholster and repeat.




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After reading the link I consider myself fortunate to been involved with competition archery from an early age using recurve bows. As a child through adolescents I had a nickname of Nipper given to me by my father. He was the one who had to replace the fletching's on my arrows.
~
Without even thinking about this process I have always felt that if you don't know what you target is going to do after being shot you are behind the curve. After all when we shoot a paper target we are in our mind shooting someone who needs to be shot, right. If they don't go done then you need to shoot again as quickly as possible to stop the threat. I guess in my mind this is just common sense yet as you say bad habits can be produced and could cost you valuable time in returning fire maybe even you life.
~
I have found your OP and the following posts interesting and thank you for your efforts in making us all better.
Dog. :flag:
 
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That's a great point Dog, life experiences will differ greatly across our community. I'm constantly searching for ways to make my training more realistic. Very interested in hearing how everyone does it. I'd like to consider myself a constant student...lifelong learner.

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reaper66

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January 9, 2014
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My practice involves shooting on the move, rapid reloads, target assessment and 360 degree awareness.
Due to events out of my control, I haven't been able to do anything but dry fire practice at home since the beginning of April.

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jakeball

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March 13, 2014
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Watch surveillance videos of shootings. Recreate scenario, cant get any more real than that. Dont matter if your a crack shot or not, practicing drills with people yelling in your face is stressful and helps you control your emotions.

Use dollar store toy guns or airsoft pistols.
Never even bring a real gun on the field.




Shoot Strait!
 

whitewolf68

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God knows that I need more practice but with little time and money for it, it's hard to say the least.
 

BuckJM53

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March 5, 2012
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As you guys well know, there are numerous experts and many training programs out there today that do their best to make you believe that their techniques and training programs are the absolute best way to train for self defense (thank God for capitalism ;)). While all of the ones that I've looked into over the years have some excellent elements and training drills, as an old guy with a bad back who doesn't move that well anymore, I'm not convinced that running through kill houses and multi-station events is the best way for me to prepare for that moment moment in my life that I hope will never come (I'm also not excited to blow hundreds or thousands of dollars just so that I can hang a certificate on the wall and brag that I trained for a week with "Blah Blah" at the "Blah Blah Blah" academy or placed first at a staged event). Accordingly, my practice routine is a simple process using elements that I honestly believe must be mastered in order to have the best chance of walking away alive if I'm ever faced with having to draw my pistol to defend myself. To that end my thoughts for what they worth are as follows (YMMV).

Since it is impossible to know in advance and practice for the exact self defense scenario that we all hope we're never faced with, my training drills focus primarily on the elements that I absolutely know will be necessary to give me the best opportunity to survive the event, which are: Drawing my pistol quickly/smoothly/cleanly and Getting accurate shots on target(s) quickly. The process that I use today has evolved some over the years and is comprised of three primary segments, each of which I consider to be an important building block for the next. The first two take place in the comfort of my home and the third at my local indoor range (I generally practice each twice per week with at least 20 repetitions).

1. Draw stroke from beneath my typical cover clothing (no dry fire). I think that we all would agree that if we are unable to cleanly "present our pistol" without clothing/equipment entanglement, we may as well be carrying a brick :banghead:. To that end, and knowing full well that my fine motor skills will be compromised to some degree under stress, I practice drawing from beneath both casual and dress clothing with the focus solely on the speed and consistency of the draw stroke and disengaging the safety (Note here that both of my carry pistols are carried condition #1). When I first started practicing this drill (over 9 years ago), I was lucky to get a "clean draw" 40% of the time. Through much practice (I estimate that I'm currently over 18,000 repetitions) and modification of holster placement and the tucking/draping of my shirt, I rarely experience an entanglement issue.

2. Draw stroke (cover clothing) with dry fire. I added this drill roughly 3 years ago when I decided to convert to point shooting for self defense. For this exercise I use a LaserLyte training cartridge and a large mirror that allows me to see the placement of the initial and subsequent laser (center mass) hits on a human body target (me). I must admit that when I first started practicing this method, it felt rather odd shooting at a moving human form (with a gun pointed back at me) in lieu of paper targets. I practice this drill from various angles and positions, both stationary and with some lateral movement, and also practice at least 5 magazine changes during this segment. The picture below gives you a sense of what I see in the mirror with each squeeze of the trigger (note here that as I've improved, so has the guy in the mirror :D).





3. Engaging targets closing on my position from 15, 20 and 25 feet (live fire). While I always enjoy my "aim small miss small" target practice with a variety of pistols at a variety of distances, at least a third of my range time these days is dedicated to self defense drills. Since I'm fortunate to be a member at a range with equipment that permits me to program what I want my target to do, I take full advantage of the opportunity to fire at targets closing on my position. As with drill #2, this drill is also strictly dedicated to point shooting, and due to range rules and safety concerns, it commences with my pistol in the low ready position with the safety engaged. In addition to double tap and triple tap drills facing the target straight on as in a single attacker scenario, I also position my body at approximately 30 degree angles from the target with my head facing 90 degrees from the target (pistol pointed in a safe direction of course) to simulate attackers closing at various angles. While I use my 1911-22 for the bulk of this drill due to ammo cost, I always finish with several drills utilizing one or both of my carry pistols. To provide myself with as much challenge as possible I use a 6 x 10" target located at the level that would cover roughly from the top of the sternum to mid abdomen on a 6' tall man (see examples below). While point shooting is not for everyone, I have become very comfortable and efficient with the process and rarely place a shot outside of my intended target area.







While it is impossible to know with 100% certainty how well this (or any) training will translate to real life, I believe that the muscle memory created with this simple practice plan will serve me well if and when it is ever needed. And finally, and perhaps the most important part of the self defense process in my mind is striving to always be aware of my situation and surroundings, and trying my best to never put myself in obvious danger. While I know full well that anything can potentially happen at any time, I think that we can all agree that we can certainly improve our odds by thinking in advance about what we choose to do and where we choose to go.
 
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ADulay

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How does everyone practice with their CCW pistol? What are your prefered drills and how much ammo do you typically shoot?

I've been focusing on follow through lately and seem to get a good workout with about 100 rounds.
Hmm, an older thread but as appropriate a spot to post this as any I suppose.

Was at the range yesterday to work on some weak hand shooting. Had the GoPro camera running for later review and grabbed this screen shot from it. I may have to try the videos at 60fps instead of 30fps to see if I can get those spent casings to really come out sharp in the frame grab.

They had the range set up for a weekend Steel Challenge match and this was Bay 5 being unused so I dropped in on it for a few hundred rounds of Weak Hand Only shooting at 10 and 15 yards with the occasional run out to 20 yards, just to make sure I could do it.

Yes, my left hand does get sore after a hundred rounds or so. That's why we practice!

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ADulay

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Hmm, must be that time of the year for catching brass or something.

While working on my 20 yard shots for the IDPA Classifier, I caught this nice double tap with TWO brass casings in the air!!

This with a Glock 26.

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