• For those that are or may be expiriencing login issues, please try using https://www.ohgunowners.net

    That seems to resolve the problem some have been having.

    Also if you'd like to use the secure connection obviously you can with out problem.

    If you do have any issues please use the contact link at the bottom to let me know so I can look further into it.

    Thank you,

    Andy

Are You Training For Fads, Fantasy Or A Fight?

BuckJM53

Member
nra
Joined
March 5, 2012
Messages
347
Likes
19
#1
This article/analysis by Tom Givens puts in the nutshell what I have believed and practiced in my SD exercises for many years. It really puts things into perspective :)

When I first started training people as a side-line job in 1975, you could count on one hand the people who made a living providing defensive firearms training – outside of government and police academies. By the time I started training full time in 1996, the number had grown greatly. Now, there are scores of people teaching firearms use full time and a horde teaching on occasion. This expansion into what is now often called “the training industry” has brought quality firearms training within the reach of any serious student, anywhere in the US. Unfortunately, it has also brought a tidal wave of unqualified “instructors” into the mix, with all sorts of trademark gimmicks designed to lure in unknowing customers. Many of these new trainers’ courses feature high round counts, lots of flashy movement drills, and “new and better” ways ... (link below for the entire article)
https://americanhandgunner.com/are-you-training-for-fads-fantasy-or-a-fight/
 

ADulay

Member
nra
Army
airforce
nra instructor
Joined
January 10, 2012
Messages
841
Likes
33
#2
I agree totally with that article.

The "When do we jump out of the flaming helicopter" quote was priceless!!

Seriously, if you're training for the Zombie Invasion, perhaps one should rethink why they're carrying a sidearm.

Train on the BASICS every time you're at the range. Movement if you can do it or at least the leg and muscle movement to at least challenge your static position.

You may not have the luxury of taking a two handed stance to shoot. It will more likely be a strong hand only quick snap and it's done.

Work on things you don't do well. If your draw stroke is abysmal, get a timer and work on it.

AD
 

BuckJM53

Member
nra
Joined
March 5, 2012
Messages
347
Likes
19
#3
I agree totally with that article.

The "When do we jump out of the flaming helicopter" quote was priceless!!

Seriously, if you're training for the Zombie Invasion, perhaps one should rethink why they're carrying a sidearm.

..............
Agreed! Many seem to seek the "new and better" route when the best option is most often the time tested techniques IMHO. While I can appreciate the competition/capitalism aspects of training offered these days, "simple skills" mastered that are relevant to "real life likely scenarios" are far more important in my thinking then wasting hundreds or thousands of dollars chasing the latest training craze so that one can say I trained with Blah Blah at the Blah Blah institute and hang a meaningless certificate on the wall.